In this episode of Weekly Poker Hand, I face a difficult situation when I look down at AJs versus a large raise from a tight short-stacked player.

The audio-only version is below:

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Thank you for watching.

6 Comments

  • David Vaughn says:

    Johnathan,

    Nice hand to replay. Not having history on this guy makes it a tough situation. Were you more willing to reraise given the fact that this was the guy’s second hand at the table and the second time he raised 4X? I assume you didn’t want to flat because it would set up a squeeze opportunity for one of the players behind you? Why wouldn’t you want to flat here in position? Granted, after the flop all the chips are probably going in given your draw, right?

    • I am rarely a fan of calling a 4 big blind raise to see what happens on the flop when I am not closing the action and the stacks are short. I am not super concerned about getting squeezed but it is a possibility. The problem is I don’t really know which flops are good for me. Of course, if I flatted this time and saw that flop, I am not folding, but that really isn’t how you should be thinking. You must think which line will lead to the best outcome on average, not on one specific flop.

    • David Vaughn says:

      What type of range did you put him on here? I don’t remember exactly from the webinar? I’d figure 88+, Broadway cards, suited Aces down to A-10s or maybe even wider?

    • I wasn’t sure about his range. This is one of those spots where I don’t put a player on any sort of definitive range. It could be super tight or it could be a standard raising range. I was unsure if the 4bb raise had any relevance given his only other raise was also to 4bbs. Of course, if he minraised twice before than raised to 4bbs, I would assume the 4bb raise drastically changed his range.

  • Alex says:

    Jonathan,

    you said that you certaintly plan to call an all-in cause you are getting great pot odds.. but as I did again the calculations

    65500 (his stack) + 26000 (your re raise) + 4500 (blinds) = 96000 and you have to call another 40k

    So 40/96=0,416 so you are way behind with an equity of 33%+

    Have I misunderstood something?

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