Weekly Poker Hand, Episode 13

12 Comments

  • Emma Goldman says:

    Jon, hi, at about 4:26 you say there are “9 cards left.” There are 3 clubs on the board, and you have 2 in your hand. That would make 8 clubs left. Where does that 9 come from? Thanks so much. Great hand 🙂

  • Emma Goldman says:

    One more Jon: I’m not sure 2/3/4/5/7 is a straight flush. That’s what the text said. Thanks 🙂

  • Emma Goldman says:

    Hi one last: I also think the fact that you didn’t raise any street certainly communicated you did not have a made flush and encouraged your O to shove the river. He could have put you on that sole ace of clubs. 99% of the cash games I’m now in, folks would have shoved the turn or reraised substantially on the turn once the flush was made and scared away Os.

  • Emma Goldman says:

    Jon, how come you didn’t put him on a made flush just like you by the turn? Mathematically is it just unlikely both of you are holding 2 clubs? Thanks 🙂

    • Like you said, it is quite difficult for both of us to have a flush. Also, when I am drawing to a hand, I am usually drawing with the intention of playing that hand as the effective nuts when I make it. For example, if I had something like 4c-3c on 8c-7c-2d, someone bets, someone calls, and someone else then calls, I am almost always folding my bad flush draw because it is highly likely that I will only get action when I improve if I am against a better flush. Heads up, it is much less of a concern.

  • William Luciano says:

    Jonathan,

    Another good video. I have been learning about some of these bluff inducing/pot control lines against LAGs and maniacs from your videos and they really work ! Against this type of villain I would bet that he doesn’t even have an Ace many times in this same situation. My question is, let’s say you are sitting there with AQ do you play the hand the same way ? I would say yes because you have not shown any strength the entire hand. What about AT? Assuming you fold that preflop, but if you did call I would guess you would have to call him down on that too. Thoughts ?

    Bill

    • I likely would play AQ and AT in the same way although I would like my hand much less. As the maniac becomes a bit more sane, you have to be careful with hands like top pair with a marginal kicker because your opponent could easily backdoor into a random two pair that has you beat.

  • Emma Goldman says:

    Bill, I love your question. Jon and Ed Miller together have given me great ammo against LAGs and maniacs. I play them now with no fear. They destroy their own stacks especially in tournaments. They have one speed. And to Jon’s point, their style is so exploitable. Final table, some nutcase shoved K/9 against my A/K, and almost called a shove with his A/10 off after another player ahead of him called. Really bad decisions.

    Jon, these words are transformative strategy and the core definition of no monsters under the bed: “I am usually drawing with the intention of playing that hand as the effective nuts when I make it.” 🙂

    • I am glad you find the content to be useful. When you make what is effectively the nuts, don’t be afraid to put lots of money in! Good luck in the future.

    • William Luciano says:

      Emma,

      Before I started watching Jonathan’s videos and posting on forums I really didn’t understand how to deal with maniacs. Now I am consistently beating them especially the bad ones. I was playing a WSOPC circuit event the other day and was card dead for a few hours against some bad maniacs, I was down to 1/2 a stack (6000 chips). Then I got 2 decent hands and 1 monster. I was up to about 50 or 60 thousand after that and it propelled me to the final table ! To Jonathan’s point not all maniacs are created equal, but with the real bad ones you can call down with a medium strength hand and get the best of it.

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